[RFC v9 2/5] dt-bindings: pstore-block: new support for blkoops

Rob Herring robh at kernel.org
Fri Feb 22 15:36:31 UTC 2019


+boot-architecture list

On Tue, Feb 19, 2019 at 07:52:47PM +0800, liaoweixiong wrote:
> Create DT binding document for blkoops.
> 
> Signed-off-by: liaoweixiong <liaoweixiong at allwinnertech.com>
> ---
>  .../devicetree/bindings/pstore/blkoops.txt         | 53 ++++++++++++++++++++++
>  MAINTAINERS                                        |  1 +
>  2 files changed, 54 insertions(+)
>  create mode 100644 Documentation/devicetree/bindings/pstore/blkoops.txt
> 
> diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/pstore/blkoops.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/pstore/blkoops.txt
> new file mode 100644
> index 0000000..5462915
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/pstore/blkoops.txt
> @@ -0,0 +1,53 @@
> +Blkoops oops logger
> +===================
> +
> +Blkoops provides a block partition for oops, excluding panics now, so they can
> +be recovered after a reboot.
> +
> +Any space of block device will be used for a circular buffer of oops records.
> +These records have a configurable size, with a size of 0 indicating that they
> +should be disabled.
> +
> +At least one of "block-device" and "total_size" must be set.
> +
> +At least one of "dmesg-size" or "pmsg-size" must be set non-zero.
> +
> +Required properties:
> +
> +- compatible: must be "blkoops".
> +
> +Optional properties:
> +
> +- block-device: The block device to use. Most of the time, it is a partition of
> +		device. If block-device is NULL, no block device is effective
> +		and the data will be lost after rebooting.
> +		It accept the following variants:
> +		1) <hex_major><hex_minor> device number in hexadecimal
> +		   represents itself no leading 0x, for example b302.
> +		2) /dev/<disk_name> represents the device number of disk
> +		3) /dev/<disk_name><decimal> represents the device number of
> +		   partition - device number of disk plus the partition number
> +		4) /dev/<disk_name>p<decimal> - same as the above, that form is
> +		   used when disk name of partitioned disk ends on a digit.
> +		5) PARTUUID=00112233-4455-6677-8899-AABBCCDDEEFF representing
> +		   the unique id of a partition if the partition table provides
> +		   it. The UUID may be either an EFI/GPT UUID, or refer to an
> +		   MSDOS partition using the format SSSSSSSS-PP, where SSSSSSSS
> +		   is a zero-filled hex representation of the 32-bit
> +		   "NT disk signature", and PP is a zero-filled hex
> +		   representation of the 1-based partition number.
> +		6) PARTUUID=<UUID>/PARTNROFF=<int> to select a partition in
> +		   relation to a partition with a known unique id.
> +		7) <major>:<minor> major and minor number of the device
> +		   separated by a colon.

No.

I didn't suggest to go look at PARTUUID to copy it into the binding, but 
rather to point out that the kernel can already mount by UUID. 
Specifying the UUID in DT is also not what I suggested. My suggestion is 
to define a known UUID so that the kernel (and bootloaders, userspace, 
the world) can just know the UUID. Just like the EFI system partition. 
Now this means you have to get it defined in the UEFI specification 
(or maybe EBBR[1]). If you want help with how to do that, the 
boot-architecture list is a good place to start.

major/minor numbers are a Linux thing, so they don't go in DT.
/dev/* is Linux thing, so it doesn't go in DT.

You can always define all these parameters as kernel command line 
options and avoid DT. That would also make this work on *all* systems, 
not just DT based systems. (Though I still believe that the partition 
should be discoverable.)

Rob

[1] https://github.com/ARM-software/ebbr




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